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The Fret Board 1. Overview 2. Horizontal Chromatic Scales 3. Horizontal Chromatic Scales: Play-along Exercise 1 4.

Horizontal Chromatic Scales: Play-along Exercise 2 5. Vertical Chromatic Scales 6. Vertical Chromatic Scales: Play-along Exercise 1 7. Vertical Chromatic Scales: Play-along Exercise 2 2.

The Major Scale 8. Overview 9. The Cycle of 4ths and 5ths The Vertical C Major Scale The Horizontal C Major Scale Vertical Major Scales: Play-along Exercise 1 Horizontal Major Scales: Play-along Exercise 2 Overview Vertical 3-Note Arpeggios Vertical 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 1 Horizontal 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 1 Horizontal 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 2 Horizontal 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 3 Horizontal 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 4 4.

Minor Scales Horizontal and Vertical Minor Scales Natural Minor: Play-along Exercise 1 Harmonic Minor: Play-along Exercise 2 Melodic Minor: Play-along Exercise 3 5.

Major 7: Play-along Exercise Learn Them All! Combining Horizontal and Vertical Arpeggios Making a Practice Rhythm Track C Major 7th: Play-along Exercise 8.

Harmonizing the Major Scales Intervals: 2nds Intervals: 3rds Intervals: 4ths Intervals: 5ths Intervals: 6ths Intervals: 7ths Intervals: Play-along Exercise 9.

Playing Melodies Harmonizing Melodies First Part: The Melody Second Part: The 3rd Above Third Part: The 3rd Below Harmonizing Scales with Triads Triad Inversions: Play-along Exercise Harmonizing a Melody with Triad Inversions Harmonizing Scales with 4-Note Chords Harmonizing Scales: Play-along Exercise Harmonizing a Melody with 4-Note Chords Modes Chord Progressions Learning Chord Progressions: I-vi-ii-V Chord Melody Techniques Chord Melody Techniques: Play-along Exercise Harmonizing Scales with Three Notes Voice Leading Voice Leading Exercise 1 Voice Leading Exercise 2 Voice Leading Exercise 3 Voice Leading: Performance Example Finger Control Improvisation: Overview Improvisation: Major Tonality Improvisation: Major Improvisation Example Improvisation: Major Improvisation Play-along Exercise Improvisation: Minor Tonality Improvisation: Minor Improvisation Example Improvisation: Minor Improvisation Play-along Exercise Improvisation: Dominant Tonality Improvisation: Dominant Improvisation Example Improvisation: Dominant Improvisation Play-along Exercise Improvisation: Extended Dominant Improvisation Improvisation: Extended Dominant Improv.

Play-along Exercise Improvisation: Major-Minor Pentatonic Scales Improvisation: Major Pentatonic Improvisation Example Improvisation: Major Pentatonic Play-along Exercise Improvisation: Minor Pentatonic Improvisation Example Improvisation: Minor Pentatonic Improv.

Improvisation: Flat 9 Minor Tonality Improvisation: Flat 9 Major Tonality Improvisation: Diminished Tonality Improvisation: Diminished Tonality Play-along Exercise Improvisation: Diminished Over Dominant Tonality Improvisation: Augmented Whole Tone Tonality Improvisation: Super Locrian Tonality Improvisation: ii-V Progression Improvisation: ii-V Progression Play-along Exercise Improvisation: ii-V-I Progression Improvisation: ii-V-i Progression Improvisation: ii-V-i Progression Play-along Exercise Improvisation: I-vi-ii-V Progression Frank started each lesson by asking what I was working on.

Without a pause, he would show me an exercise - we never used a book - to target my shortcomings. As we worked through a lesson, I jotted it down in a notebook so I could always remember it correctly.

One night Frank suggested we write a lesson book based on my notes from the lessons I had taken with him. Of course I agreed enthusiastically. After the first draft was complete Frank was pleased with the result but thought we should expand on many of the lessons, add topics, fill in gaps and include video of him demonstrating every concept.

The goal: Develop a comprehensive guitar method that players of all levels can use as an invaluable resource. Despite our subsequent work as just described, the lessons in this book and the accompanying videos are the same as those I worked on with Frank.

Glenn Tosto New York City, September How to Use this Book Each chapter begins with an overview followed by step-by-step instructions that correspond to the video segments.

This is a supplement to the video and has many of the lessons from the video written out in all 12 keys.

After you have watched the video segment, use this as a refresher to remind you of the lesson you are working on.

For more guidance: notation, tablatures, chord grids, and examples are also provided after the text sections.

Some lessons include graphic displays of chord shapes with fingerings. Rather than starting with the chord grids and memorizing the shapes, we suggest you work through the lessons first to increase your knowledge of the fret board.

Refer to these pages when needed and for confirmation that you have done the lesson correctly. Theory is covered throughout the book and can be very helpful to understand.

We encourage you to study this material but do not get hung up on it. If a concept is unclear or confusing, read it through and move on.

If you review the theory after you have worked through the lesson you will likely have a better grasp of it. Chapter 1 The Fret Board Segment 1.

We refer to each string with a number. The top E string, which is highest in pitch, is the 1st string, the 2nd is B, the 3rd - G, the 4th - D, the 5th — A, and the 6th is Low E, the bottom string.

From the low E to the A string is an interval called a 4th. From the strings A to the D and the D to the G are also a 4th apart.

From the G string to the B string is a 3rd and then from the B to the high E is another 4th. The frets are metal wires embedded in the fingerboard.

They are numbered from 1 up, starting at the 1st, the fret farthest from your body. A whole step is made up of 2 frets. The fret board is arranged based on the chromatic scale, which contains all 12 notes played sequentially.

Think of a piano keyboard: the white keys that are not separated by a black key are B and C and E and F. Unlike the guitar, which is arranged on the chromatic scale, the keyboard is laid out based on the major scale.

If you start at C on the piano and play every white key until you get to the next C octave , you play the C major scale.

Each note or step of any major scale can be referred to by Roman numerals. More commonly we refer to notes in the scale with numbers, such as the 3rd, 4th, 5th, etc.

Roman numerals refer to the chords that can be built on each note of the major scale. I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, and vii.

The root chord is built on the first note of the major scale, so the first note here is the I chord; the chord built on the 5th note of the major scale is referred to as the V chord.

Uppercase Roman numerals indicate a major chord; lowercase indicate a minor chord. Segment 2. Horizontal Chromatic Scales In this segment we play the horizontal chromatic scale.

In the play-along that follows we will use the following approach. Starting on the open top string, play each note up to the octave and back.

Play all down strokes with your picking hand. Pick through the string and allow the pick to rest on the string below. Do not lift your fingers after you place them down on the fret board.

Once you play to the 4th fret, shift your hand up the fret board and play the next note at the 5th fret with your 1st finger. When descending, shift all 4 fingers into place one finger per fret.

Strive to make each note clean and even with a good tone. Continue the same steps on each string. Occasionally, think of the names of the note you are playing.

Segment 3. Horizontal Chromatic Scales: Play-along Exercise 1 1. Play the horizontal chromatic scale as demonstrated in the video and written in the notation that follows.

Play the horizontal chromatic scales on each string, starting on the high E string up to the 12th fret and back. When ascending, keep your fingers on the fingerboard once they are placed.

When descending, shift your hand down into place, positioning one finger over each fret. Test yourself by naming the notes as you play them.

Play to this video every day as a quick warm-up. Horizontal Chromatic Scales: Play-along Exercise 2 1. Play this exercise slowly striving for a good tone.

Eventually build to a faster tempo. Begin on the low E string, playing 4 notes before shifting your hand up to the next position.

Play up to the octave and down before moving to the next string. When ascending; keep your fingers on the fingerboard once they are placed. When descending shift your hand down into place, positioning one finger over each fret.

Vertical Chromatic Scales In this segment we play the vertical chromatic scale. Start on the low open E and play each note up to the 4 th fret, then move to the open A string, play each note up to the 4th fret then move to the open D, etc.

Be aware that when you get to the G string you only play up to the 3rd fret before moving up to the open B string. This is due to an anomaly in the way the guitar is tuned: The interval between each of the open strings is a 4th except for the G to B string, which is a 3rd.

Once you get to the high E string, descend playing the same chromatic scale in reverse. Next, test yourself by randomly choosing notes and finding all of them on the fret board.

Segment 6. Vertical Chromatic Scales: Play-along Exercise 1 1. Play the vertical chromatic scale as demonstrated in the video and written in the notation that follows.

Play from the low E to the high E at a nice slow tempo. Focus on a good clean tone. Do this every day, building your tempo over time. Vertical Chromatic Scales: Play-along Exercise 2 1.

Do these exercises with alternate picking, picking down up, down up. Strive for an identical sound with both the down and up stroke. Use alternate fingerings as follows: Start on the A at the 5th fret of the low E string and play up 4 notes.

When you move to the 5th string, shift your hand down to play the next note on the 4th fret. When you move to the 4th string, shift your hand down to play the next note on the 3rd fret.

When you move to the 3rd string, shift your hand down to play the next note on the 2nd fret. Remember that when you move from the 3rd string to the 2nd string you have to adjust for the different interval between those 2 strings, so do not shift, play the next note on the 2nd fret.

When you move to the 1st string, shift your hand down to play the next note on the 1st fret. Play up to the A on the top string, and descend shifting up a fret when switching strings with the exception of the move from the B to the G string.

Play down to the low A, sliding into the last note with your 1 st finger. Work to increase your tempo over time. Finally, increase your speed while you play the 2-octave scale.

The most important thing is to strive for a good clean sound with an even tone on every note. Use alternate fingerings as follows: Start on the A at the 5th fret of the low E string and playing up 4 notes.

After playing up 4 notes on each string, shift your hand down to play the next 4 notee one fret lower on the next string.

When you move from the 3rd string to the 2nd string you have to adjust for the different interval between those 2 strings, so do not shift, play the next note on the 2nd fret.

Play down to the low A, sliding into the last note with your 1st finger. Overview The major scale is the first of the diatonic scales and the foundation of western music.

I believe that the best way to learn the fret board is to start by learning the various ways to play the major scale.

You build the major scale by starting on a key note and applying the following formula: whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step.

Write all 12 notes on a piece of paper and apply the formula above to each of the notes to build the major scale in all 12 keys.

In this chapter we will approach the major scale both vertically and horizontally and then we will combine the approaches.

Play in all keys around the cycle of fourths. Segment 9. The Cycle of 4ths and 5ths The cycle of fourths also called the cycle of fifths shows the relationships among the twelve notes and tones of the chromatic scale, their corresponding key signatures and related major and minor keys.

Refer to the diagram of the cycle of fourths. If you count letter names counter clockwise from C you see that the next key, F, is 4 notes away.

Counting clockwise from C the next key, G, is 5 notes away, hence the name cycle of fourths or cycle of fifths. Using the notes that make up the cycle of fourths as a starting point is a more musical approach because it emulates chord changes you find in a piece of music.

Segment After we cover some basic scales, I will show you how to make up your own fingerings. Since it is important to be able to play both vertically and horizontally, we will cover both, beginning with the vertical approach, and then horizontal method.

Build the major scale by starting on a key note and applying the following formula: whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step.

Start with the basic vertical major scale beginning on the C at the 3rd fret of the 5th string as demonstrated in the video and written in the notation that follows.

Next we learn how to find other fingerings. Place your first finger on the same C. Play a one octave C scale beginning with your 1st finger, hunting down the notes that make up the C scale.

Next, fret the same C with your 2nd finger and repeat the exercise. Using a different digit to start the scale forces you to come up with an alternative fingering.

Next, start with your 3rd finger and play a C scale. Finally, start with your 4th finger and play a C scale. Use this same approach with every C note on the guitar.

After you do the 1-octave scales, connect them to build 2-octave scales. Then, do 3-octave scales. Use this approach to find several ways to play scales, arpeggios and chords in upcoming studies.

After playing in the key of C, take the major scale around the cycle of fourths with the goal of playing in all 12 keys. Begin playing with your 2nd finger.

Start with your 1st finger. After you do the 1-octave scales, connect them to build 2-octave scales, then, 3-octave scales Segment The Horizontal C Major Scale 1.

Play the notes of the C major scale, ascending and descending on each of the 6 strings, one at a time, beginning with the open string.

In our example we go as high as the 15th fret. You should play as high as you can on your guitar. Take note of your starting point when playing the lowest note of the scale on each string.

For example: In the key of C the high E string is the 3rd note of the C scale, the B string is the major 7th, the open G string the 5th, The A string is the 6th and the low E is another 3rd.

Recognize the root of the scale each time you play it. Test yourself by thinking of the note and interval you are playing.

Start off with a nice slow tempo, striving for a good clean tone. Continue to practice this lesson as a quick warm up, focusing on 1 or 2 key signatures at a time.

Use all different fingerings and positions each time you play through the cycle. Play the vertical major scales as demonstrated in the play-along video segment and written in the notation that follows.

Start at a slow tempo and work towards increasing the speed each time. Play the horizontal major scales as demonstrated in the play-along video segment and written in the notation that follows.

Note that in the video I play all 12 keys on the high E string. Another approach is to play in each key on all 6 strings before moving to the next key as written in the notation that follows.

When you get to the root of the scale, play the chord in place of the note to hear the tonal center of the scale. Test yourself by thinking about what interval you are starting on in each key.

Also, try playing the root chord before you start the scale on each string to get the tonal center in your ear. The guitar is the only instrument with so many options to play a simple C scale; and also why it is so hard to sight-read on guitar.

Begin working through my Essential Fingerings for a C scale. Learn 2 fingerings per week and your knowledge of the fret board will increase tremendously in the first few months.

This is the key to connecting your fingers and your brain to your ears and playing what you hear. Do not concern yourself with memorizing all of the variations.

The point is to understand how you can make small changes to the fingerings to come up with many variations. These are just suggestions.

You can use whatever 4ngerings you are comfortable with. Overview Chapter 3 is similar to Chapter 2, but instead of playing the major scale we play arpeggios; first vertically, then horizontally, beginning with the C major arpeggio.

An arpeggio is made up of the same notes used to play the chord of the same name. The difference is that when you strum a chord, you play all of the notes simultaneously; when you play an arpeggio, you pick each note one at a time.

The most basic chord is a triad. As its name implies, it has 3 notes. Build arpeggios and chords by selecting every other note of the scale, known as intervals called 3rds.

You can identify any interval by counting the letter names in the scale inclusively. Therefore, the C major triad is built with the 1st, 3rd and 5th, or every other note of the major scale: C-E-G.

Since chords and arpeggios are made up of the same notes, a major arpeggio contains the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale, which are C- the root, E -the 3rd and G-the 5th.

Arpeggios are building blocks for solos and important to master. Vertical 3-Note Arpeggios In this segment we use the same approach we used to identify the variations of the C major scale and apply it to the C major arpeggio.

Find a C on the fingerboard. Place your first finger on the C. Hunt down the notes of the C arpeggio beginning with your 1st finger. Using a different digit forces you to come up with an alternative fingering.

Next, start with your 3rd finger and play a C arpeggio. Finally, start with your 4th finger and play a C arpeggio. Use this same approach using every C on the guitar as a starting point.

The next step is to connect these arpeggios to build 2-octave arpeggios with the same approach. Next, play these arpeggios in the other keys around the cycle of fourths.

Vertical 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 1 In this play-along we play the vertical major arpeggio in all 12 keys around the cycle of fourths just as we did with the major scale.

The object is to get through all 12 keys at a slow tempo without stopping. Play the vertical major arpeggio as demonstrated in this play-along video and written in the notation that follows.

Fingerings and positions do not matter. Choose different fingerings each time. The goal is to get through all keys without stopping.

Use the hold note to think ahead to the next key. Next step is to increase the tempo a little. Remember to make up your own variations exploring all possible fingerings and positions.

Practice this a little bit every day. Horizontal 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 1 In this play-along we play the horizontal major arpeggio in all 12 keys around the cycle of fourths just as we did with the major scale.

In this play-along we will play the major arpeggios around the cycle of fourths, ascending and descending on each string horizontally. Begin with the root note of each of the arpeggios and play the arpeggios up and down the fingerboard beginning on the E string and go around the cycle before moving to the next string.

It is up to you to take this exercise to the other 5 strings. Next, begin on the lowest note of the arpeggio. For example: in C, start with the open E, the 3rd of the arpeggio, in the key of F start on F the root, in the key of Bb start on F the 5th, in the key of Eb start on G the 3rd, etc.

Use this same approach to play arpeggios on all strings around the cycle of fourths. Note that in the video I do all 12 keys on the high E string.

Another approach is to play in each key on all 6 strings before moving to the next key, as written in the notation that follows.

Horizontal 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 2 1. In this play-along we take the root note and play them for 2 beats each, around the cycle of 4ths on the top string as demonstrated in the video and written in the following notation.

Next, play the same note in different positions as demonstrated in the video and written in the following notation. Next, play the same note in different positions.

Horizontal 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 3 In this play-along we play the 3-note arpeggios around the cycle of fourths on the top E string.

Play the horizontal major arpeggios as demonstrated in this play-along video and written in the notation that follows.

Starting with the root on the top string, play the major arpeggios: , using quarter notes, ending with a whole note on the root, around the cycle of fourths.

When you get to the hold note think ahead to the next arpeggio you are going to play. Another approach is to play each key on all 6 strings before moving to the next key.

Horizontal 3-Note Arpeggios: Play-along Exercise 4 In this play-along we play the arpeggios around the cycle of fourths on the top E string.

The only difference between this play-along and the previous one is that we will begin with the lowest note of the arpeggio rather than the root. For example: In C, start with the open E, the 3rd of the arpeggio, in the key of F start on F the root, in the key of Bb start on F the 5 th, in the key of Eb start on G the 3rd, etc.

We play quarter notes ending with a whole note when we get back to the lowest note. During the note of rest, think about the next arpeggio you are going to play.

Speed is not the goal. The goal is a nice clean tone and even notes. Vertically they are played simultaneously; horizontally, played sequentially.

Intervals are named by counting letter names inclusively. For example: C to E is a third. Overview So far we have focused on the major scale, major triads and major arpeggios.

In this chapter we turn our focus to the minor scales. The formula for the natural minor scale, from the root is: whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step 2.

The only difference between the natural minor and the harmonic minor scale is a raised 7th. The melodic minor is unique because it is different ascending from descending.

The formula for the melodic minor scale ascending is the same as the natural minor scale: whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step 5.

Descending, the formula from the root is: half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step 6.

Apply the same approach to the natural minor scale that we applied to the major scale. Write all 12 notes on a piece of paper. Apply the formulas above to each of the notes to build the minor scale in all 12 keys.

Horizontal and Vertical Minor Scales Vertical The natural minor scale is derived from the major scale. In the key of C minor the scale is related to the Eb major scale.

In fact, it contains the same notes. The only difference is that we start playing the scale on the C instead of the Eb.

Play a C natural minor scale beginning on the 3rd fret of the A string with your 1st finger. Find a C note on the fret board.

Hunt down the notes of the C natural minor scale and play a one-octave scale. Next, fret the same C note with your 2nd finger and repeat the exercise.

Next, start with your 3rd finger and play another one octave C natural minor scale. Finally, start with your 4th finger and play another variation of the C natural minor scale.

It is up to you work through the harmonic minor and melodic minor scales using this approach with a goal of playing in all of the keys and in all positions.

Horizontal Find the root note of the natural minor scale on the top string and apply its formula to play the scale horizontally on one string at a time.

Play the notes of the scale all the way up the fingerboard. When descending, play all the notes of the scale ending on the lowest scale tone before moving to the next string.

Remember that in the key of C minor, the notes are the same as an Eb major scale. Next, start with the lowest note of the scale on each string and play the scale.

Each time you get to the root of the scale play the root chord. Combine the horizontal and vertical approach with the use of jumping off points to go from one string to another.

For example, on the A string play the C natural minor scale starting with the C at the 3rd fret. Play up to the Bb and finish with the C on the D string.

Next, move off the A string at the 7th tone, and finish with the last 2 notes of the scale on the D string. Next, play the last 3 notes on the D string, etc.

Come up with as many different variations as you can. Focus on internalizing the sound of the scale. Recognize the root of the scale each time you play it by playing a chord in its place.

Natural Minor: Play-along Exercise 1 In this play-along we play the natural minor scale around the cycle of fourths starting with C minor.

Refer to the video and the notation following as a guide, but remember to come up with a different variation every time you play to it.

Play the natural minor scale as demonstrated in this play-along video and written in the notation. Try to vary your fingerings and positions each time you play to this video segment.

The main focus is to get the sound of the scale in your ear and recognize it when you hear it being played. You can also do this to a metronome, increasing your speed incrementally over time.

Harmonic Minor: Play-along 2 In this play-along we play the harmonic minor scale around the cycle of fourths starting in the key of C minor.

Remember that the only difference between the natural minor and harmonic minor is the raised 7th in the harmonic minor. Refer to the video and the notation that follows as a guide, but remember to come up with a different variation every time you play to it.

Play the harmonic minor scale as demonstrated in this play-along video and written in the notation that follows. Vary your fingerings and positions each time you play to this segment.

When working with scales remember to internalize the sound in an effort to connect what you have in your ear with your fingers.

Strive for a good even tone. Test yourself by thinking what note you are on and what interval it is. Play these scales horizontally as well, using the same approach we used in the previous lessons.

Combine the horizontal and vertical approach with the use of jumping off points to move vertically from one string to another as we did previously.

Melodic Minor: Play-along Exercise 3 The melodic minor scale is different ascending from descending. Ascending, it is the same as the natural minor and descending you play a raised 7th and raised 6th.

Another way to play this scale is to ascend with the raised 6 th and 7th and then descend using the natural minor.

I want you to practice it both ways but in this play-along we ascend with the raised 6 th and 7th and descend using the natural minor.

Write out all 12 notes on paper. Write out the melodic minor scales in all 12 keys using both formulas. Play the scales around the cycle of fourths with the raised 6 th and 7th ascending and the natural minor descending.

Refer to the video segment and in the notation that follows. Vary your fingerings and positions each time you play to this video segment. Test yourself thinking what note you are on and what interval it is.

Next, play horizontally on each of the 6 strings as we have done with the other scales. Overview Remember the major chord is made up of the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale.

The same concept applies to minor chords except that we use the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the minor scale. What each of the 3 minor scales has in common is they all have a root, minor 3rd and 5th.

The flatted 3rd is the foundation of the minor scales as well as the chords and arpeggios derived from these scales.

Vertical 1. The minor arpeggio, like the major arpeggio, is 3 made up of notes. The only difference between a major and a minor triad or arpeggio is that minor has a flat 3rd, which means the middle note is played a half step lower.

Write all 12 notes on a piece of paper and apply the formula above to each of the notes to build the minor arpeggio in all 12 keys. Play the vertical C minor C-Eb-G arpeggio.

Apply the same approach we used with the major arpeggios. Play the C minor arpeggio starting with your 1st finger, hunt down the notes to play a one-octave arpeggio.

Using a different digit to start forces you to come up with an alternative fingering. Next, start with your 3rd finger and play another C minor arpeggio.

Finally, start with your 4th finger and play another C minor arpeggio. Apply this same approach using every C note as a starting point.

Note that in the video I do all 12 keys on the high e string. Begin on the lowest note of the arpeggio on each string and play the minor arpeggios in every key.

For example: in C minor, on the high E string, start with the G the 5th of the arpeggio. On the 2nd string start with C the root, on the 3rd string start with G the 5th, on the 4th string start with Eb the 3rd, and on the 5th string start with C the root, on the 6th string start with G the 5th.

Go through all 12 keys, playing all the variations. Next, play just the roots of the arpeggio on each string through the cycle of fourths.

Starting with the root, play the arpeggio up and down the fingerboard on each string. Remember to focus on internalizing the sound of the minor arpeggio.

There are only 2 chord types: major and minor, so it is essential to spend the necessary time practicing them thoroughly. Play the minor arpeggios around the cycle of fourths, starting on Cm as demonstrated in this play-along video and written in the following notation.

Next, increase the tempo incrementally over time by playing this exercise to a metronome rather than the video. Remember to make up your own variations, exploring all possible fingerings and positions.

Overview So far we have focused on 3 note chords and arpeggios. Adding a 4th note to the 3 note chords adds color to music, making it more interesting.

Remember that to build the triad, use every other note in the scale. Apply the same rule to find the 4th note.

The name comes from the fact that we added the 7th note of the major scale to the major triad. In this chapter we apply the same approach to the 4-note arpeggios that we used with the 3-note arpeggios.

Start with the major triads that you worked out on paper, in all 12 keys. Build the major 7th arpeggios by adding the 7th note of the scale to each.

The same applies to the minor chords and arpeggios. Add a 4th tone to the A minor triad to build the A minor 7th.

In this example the 7th note of the A natural minor scale is G so that is the 4th note we add. Find a C note on the fingerboard.

Play the Cmaj7 arpeggio C-E-G-B , starting with your 1 st finger, hunt down the notes to play a one-octave arpeggio. Next, start with your 3rd finger and play another Cmaj7 arpeggio.

Finally, start with your 4th finger and play another Cmaj7 arpeggio. Use this same approach using every C note on the guitar as a starting point.

Do this in all 12 keys with all chord types. Remember to strive to get the sound of the chord in your ear. If your guitaer does not have enough frets to play the high notes start the arpeggio on another string or move an octave down to finish the arpeggio.

Next, begin on the lowest note of the arpeggio and play the notes up and down on each string. For example: in C, start with the open E, the 3 rd of the arpeggio, on the 2nd string, start with B, the major 7th, on the 3rd string start with G, the 5th, on the 4th string start with E, the 3rd, on the 5th string start with B, the major 7th, on the 6th string start with E, the 3rd of the arpeggio.

It is up to you to find all of the fingerings. Do this exercise in other keys with the goal of playing in all 12 keys.

Major 7: Play-along Exercise In this play-along we work on the vertical major 7th arpeggios in all 12 keys, just as we did with the major triads.

Play the major 7th exercise as demonstrated in this play-along video and written in the notation that follows. Change up your fingerings each time you play.

Play with both the vertical and horizontal approach. Reference the Inversion Excursion manual to apply this same approach to all of the 4 note chord types, such as major 6th, minor 6th, minor 7th, etc.

Experiment and work out your own exercises. Reference the Inversion Excursion manual to apply this same approach to all of the 4 note chord types.

I have demonstrated the major 7th chords and inversions using the Cmaj7 as an example. It is up to you to use the reference manual, Inversion Excursion, and continue to work on all chord types and in all keys using the tools I have provided.

An important part of learning guitar is to work through these chords, arpeggios and scales on your own.

That is how you gain a deep understanding of the guitar and internalize the different sounds. It is therefore an important process and a necessary step to becoming an accomplished guitarist.

It's up to You! It is up to you to apply the tools given to you to learn them using all the different fingerings in all postitions. Reference the included inversion excursion manual for more chord types.

Level: Intermediate Below are basic 4-note minor arepeggios around the cycle of fourths. It is up to you to apply the tools given to you to learn them with different fingerings in all postitions.

Overview In this chapter we cover 4-note arpeggios. We take the same approach we used to play the C major scale more than different ways.

We will use Cmaj7 as an example but your goal is to play all arpeggios in all keys using this same methodology. We know that to build the major 7th arpeggio we start with the triad and add the 7th note of the major scale.

Reference the video and the notation included for the following steps. Start with your 1st finger on the C at the 3rd fret of the 5th string.

Play the C maj7 arpeggio horizontally. When you get to the last note, move vertically off the 5th string and play the B at the 9th fret of the 4th string.

Next, start the same way but move vertically and play the G at the 5th fret and the B at the 9th fret of the 4th string. Finally, we play the G at the 5th fret of the 4th string and move vertically to play the B at the 4th fret of the 3rd string.

Next, start with the 2nd finger on the same C and apply the same approach as demonstrated in the video. Next we use the C major 7th arpeggio to come up with simple musical ideas.

We start our first phrases on the root. I play a simple idea and you answer with a phrase of your own. Keep it simple, melodic and strive for good even tones.

Next, start on the 3rd, or the E of the arpeggio. I play an idea and you reply with a phrase. Next, start with E but play horizontally on the B string.

Use bends and vibrato to add expression. Next, start on the 5th the G note at the 12th fret of the 3rd string and use the top strings.

Finally, we start our musical phrase on the 7th note the B. This is one of my favorites. Go through all arpeggios around the cycle, maybe one a day for 5 or 10 minutes.

Make nice melodic ideas using these tonal centers. Remember to combine the horizontal and vertical approach. Use this approach to come up with all variations.

Next we use the C Major 7th arpeggio to come up with simple musical ideas. I play a simple idea starting on the root and you answer with a phrase of your own.

Making a Practice Rhythm Track Whether you are working on scales, arpeggios, chords, melodies or improvisation, it is useful to create a play-along track to practice to.

Although there are playalong tracks available free online and for purchase, I think it is best to make your own. Start by setting a metronome to the desired tempo.

Start your recording device. Record a few minutes of the rhythm you want to work on. In our example I play the Cmaj7 on the bottom 4 strings in the 1st position for one measure and then play the Cmaj6 for one measure.

We will use this play-along and others throughout the remainder of this course. After you have recorded a few minutes, stop the recorder and listen to be sure you like the sound of the play-along.

Use this same method for creating grooves anytime you are learning a new song. Record the chords of songs to use for working on the melodies or soloing.

This is a great way to work on just about anything you are doing. C Major 7th: Play-along Exercise In this video segment we roll the play-along track we recorded to trade fours using the various tonal centers and ideas we have covered thus far.

Play along using these ideas to vary the jam. You can copy what I do, or answer what I do with your own phrase.

I will let you know what tonal center I am using each time I change it. Below is the list of tonal centers in order. Major pentatonic 2.

Major 7th 3. Major 7th arpeggio 4. Horizontal on the 2nd string 5. Major pentatonic into the minor pentatonic 6.

Major 6th 7. Low register 8. Low register on the 5th string 9. Same note on different strings Bluesy lick Thirds Scale patterns Focus on the 9th Bends with the suspended 4th Pull-offs Thirds with a bluesy ending Chapter 8 Harmonizing the Major Scales Segment Overview This Lesson builds on the horizontal scales and arpeggios that we have worked on previously.

An interval is the distance between two notes. When thinking of intervals, we often count up. Here is a link to an in-dept YouTube Playlist detailing the porperties, strengths, and thermal resistance of different filaments and plastic types.

Users of the MP Mini Delta printer are welcome, they are a part of this community just as much as anybody else.

Comments telling them they need to post elsewhere will be marked as spam. PLA Stringing Issues self. After having used my MPSMv2 for a few week now and getting closer to a very good setup besides some first layer issues i have lately started encountering more and more stringing - interestingly enough not so much the fine spidersilk-style strings but really thick, bristle like strings, that especially seem to occur when the nozzle jumps gaps or from one model to another.

I have of course already printed a calibration-tower, which has shown the best results at , but im considering maybe going even lower since there still seems to be some stringing present.

Might be your filament has too much moisture. Try to dry out the spool or trial new one and see if there is any change.

Mine even gets wet sitting out in Midwest winters Go ahead and try lower, but you will likely start running into under-extrusion issues because the plastic is melting too slow causing back pressure.

I suggest grabbing a stringing test stl from thingieverse then start playing with the settings. Note: retraction speed being too high or too low can lead to stringing, so that can be a bit tricky.

Mine are irrelevant, otherwise I would share. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. All rights reserved.

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